Friday Reads: LGBTQIA Pride Month

June is LGBTQIA Pride Month. To celebrate, here is a list of a few queer books we have at Danville Public Library.

33155325The 57 Bus by Dashka Slater

If it weren’t for the 57 bus, Sasha and Richard never would have met. Both were high school students from Oakland, California, one of the most diverse cities in the country, but they inhabited different worlds. Sasha, a white teen, lived in the middle-class foothills and attended a small private school. Richard, a black teen, lived in the crime-plagued flatlands and attended a large public one. Each day, their paths overlapped for a mere eight minutes. But one afternoon on the bus ride home from school, a single reckless act left Sasha severely burned, and Richard charged with two hate crimes and facing life imprisonment.

12000020Dante and Aristotle Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

Fifteen-year-old Aristotle Mendoza is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.

71sjpkgagtlMiddlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides

In the spring of 1974, Calliope Stephanides, a student at a girls’ school in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, finds herself drawn to a chain-smoking, strawberry blonde classmate with a gift for acting. The passion that furtively develops between them–along with Callie’s failure to develop–leads Callie to suspect that she is not like other girls. In fact, she is not really a girl at all.

 

 

31933085Less by Andrew Sean Greer

Receiving an invitation to his ex-boyfriend’s wedding, Arthur embarks on an international journey that finds him falling in love, risking his life, reinventing himself, and making connections with the past.

 

 

 

 

25330194The Cosmopolitans by Sarah Schulman

A modern retelling of Balzac’s classic Cousin Bette by one of America’s most prolific and significant writers. Earl, a black, gay actor working in a meatpacking plant, and Bette, a white secretary, have lived next door to each other in the same Greenwich Village apartment building for thirty years. Shamed and disowned by their families, both found refuge in New York and in their domestic routine. Everything changes when Hortense, a wealthy young actress from Ohio, comes to the city to “make it.”

 

23492771The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman

A chronicle of the modern struggle for gay, lesbian and transgender rights draws on interviews with politicians, military figures, legal activists and members of the LGBT community to document the cause’s struggles since the 1950s.

 

 

9780140184129Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin

Set in the 1950s Paris of American expatriates, liaisons, and violence, a young man finds himself caught between desire and conventional morality. With a sharp, probing imagination, James Baldwin’s now-classic narrative delves into the mystery of loving and creates a moving, highly controversial story of death and passion that reveals the unspoken complexities of the human heart.

 

 

28541528Changers, Book One: Drew by T. Cooper and Allison Glock-Cooper

It’s the eve of Ethan Miller’s freshman year. He’s psyched to be in high school, untill the next morning when he awakens as a girl and must now navigate the treacherous waters of ninth grade as Drew Bohner, a petite blond with an unfortunate last name. Ethan is a Changer, a little known, ancient race of humans who live out each of their four years of high school as a different person. After graduation, Changers choose which version of themselves they will be forever, and no, they cannot go back to who they were before the changes began.

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